Tuesday, December 30, 2008

Chill the Holiday Cheer!

When we were in Minnesota for Christmas, we had quite a bit of foodspiration! We arrived at Justin's aunt and uncle's house in St. Paul, we found that they had two great ways to chill the holiday cheer for the Christmas dinner!

1) Champagne bucket made from ice

This is a beautiful addition to the holiday table that can keep white wine or champagne cold. However, like other ice sculptures, it will last only for the evening. I used to make these as luminaries when we lived in Minnesota. You can make both of them in the same fashion as long as you adjust the size. You can use fresh greenery or holly or artificial- both look lovely. For step by step instructions, click here. Be sure to use large enough buckets to hold a champagne bottle and don't forget to display your creation in a dish that will hold the water as the sculpture melts. If you are in a cold weather climate, the luminaries can last as long the winter is freezing!

2) Brandy Alexander

This classic drink is making a comeback and the frosty drinks were served after Christmas dinner. The recipe can be made with cream, but Justin's family uses ice cream.

The ice cream was conveniently stored in the backseat of someone's car throughout the evening, since it was below freezing!


Justin's family uses vanilla ice cream, brandy and creme de cacao right into the blender. They don't use a recipe anymore but add the proportions to taste. They were frosty and delicious!

This drink might just become a new tradition!

1 comment:

Dennis said...

Just some added info about the ice beverage cooler. I froze the one shown with the Arctic Ice Lantern Mold. Info about the mold is available at: http://arcticicelantern.com/index.html
This is a lot easier than the method using two containers. Use distilled water for clear ice. The greenery is artificial, purchased last year, after Christmas, dirt cheap. The greenery is positioned in the mold by sticking the stems into a ring of extruded builders foam and clamping it to the top of the mold.